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Part II: A Methodology for Developing Deadlock-Free Dynamic Network Reconfiguration Processes
May 2005 (vol. 16 no. 5)
pp. 428-443

Abstract—Dynamic network reconfiguration is defined as the process of changing from one routing function to another while the network remains up and running. The main challenge is in avoiding deadlock anomalies while keeping restrictions on packet injection and forwarding minimal. Current approaches either require virtual channels in the network or they work only for a limited set of routing algorithms and/or fault patterns. In this paper, we present a methodology for devising deadlock free and dynamic transitions between old and new routing functions that is consistent with newly proposed theory [CHECK END OF SENTENCE]. The methodology is independent of topology, can be applied to any deadlock-free routing function, and puts no restrictions on the routing function changes that can be supported. Furthermore, it does not require any virtual channels to guarantee deadlock freedom. This research is motivated by current trends toward using increasingly larger Internet and transaction processing servers based on clusters of PCs that have very high availability and dependability requirements, as well as other local, system, and storage area network-based computing systems.

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Index Terms:
Interconnection network, dynamic reconfiguration, deadlock-freedom methodology, system reliability and availability.
Citation:
Olav Lysne, Timothy Mark Pinkston, Jos? Duato, "Part II: A Methodology for Developing Deadlock-Free Dynamic Network Reconfiguration Processes," IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 428-443, May 2005, doi:10.1109/TPDS.2005.59
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