The Community for Technology Leaders
RSS Icon
Subscribe
Issue No.06 - June (2003 vol.14)
pp: 529-532
Published by the IEEE Computer Society
It is time to thank some of our editorial board members who are retiring and to welcome new members to the board. The Associate Editors who have successfully completed their term are: Stephan Olariu, Krishna V. Palem, Timothy Pinkston, Neeraj Suri, Tao Yang, and Willy Zwaenepoel. We thank all of them for their commitment and effort during their tenure on the board. They have helped to maintain the high standard and quality of our journal. We would like to express our deepest appreciation for their contributions.
We also welcome a group of distinguished and highly qualified new members to our board. These new members cover a wide range of specialized areas. I am very proud to present them to you. Their biographies appear below and on the fol-lowing pages: Mustaque Ahamad, José A.B. Fortes, Jennifer C. Hou, George Karypis, Kwei-Jay Lin, Koji Nakano, A. Yavuz Oruç, Cauligi S. Raghavendra, Anand Sivasubramaniam, Jaideep Srivastava, and Ivan Stojmenovic.
The IEEE Computer Society has invested considerable time and effort to develop Manuscript Central, a software system that supports online submission of papers and reviews. In February, TPDS was moved to this new system. We believe our authors and reviewers, as well as our associate editors, will find it a very useful tool. We also encourage our authors and readers to continue to submit their papers to this journal. TPDS is still the best archival journal in our field. One of the best ways to support this journal is to submit your best papers here.
Pen-Chung Yew
Editor-in-Chief

For information on obtaining reprints of this article, please send e-mail to: tpds@computer.org, and reference IEEECS Log Number 118588.



Mustaque Ahamad received the PhD degree in computer science from the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1985. He is a professor in the College of Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, which he joined after receiving the PhD degree. His research interests span distributed operating systems, distributed algorithms, fault-tolerant systems, scalable distributed services, and secure computer systems. He developed flexible consistency models that make it possible to build scalable protocols for maintaining consistency of shared objects in wide-area distributed systems. He developed the causal consistency model for shared objects which has been widely explored. He has also done considerable work in managing replicated data using quorum protocols. The grid protocol, which was one of the first protocols to address both consistency and performance requirements, has been cited extensively in the literature. He has also done work in fault-tolerant systems, scalable middleware implementations, access control models, and multicast communication. His research has been funded by numerous grants from the US National Science Foundation and US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and by support provided by industrial sources. He has coauthored papers that received the best paper awards at the International Conference on Distributed Computing, 2001, and the Conference on High Performance Distributed Computing, 1995. He received a partnership award from the IBM Corporation. He also received the Edenfield Fellowship and the Dean's Award from the College of Computing at Georgia Tech. He has served on the program committees of several conferences in the distributed computing area, including the International Conference on Distributed Computing.



José A.B. Fortes received the BS degree in electrical engineering (Licenciatura em Engenharia Electrotécnica) from the Universidade de Angola in 1978, the MS degree in electrical engineering from Colorado State University, Fort Collins in 1981, and the PhD degree in electrical engineering from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles in 1984. His research interests are in the areas of parallel processing, computer architecture, network-computing, and fault-tolerant computing. He has authored or coauthored more than 100 technical papers. His research has been funded by the US Office of Naval Research, AT&T Foundation, IBM, General Electric, and the US National Science Foundation. He is a fellow of the IEEE. He was a Distinguished Visitor of the IEEE Computer Society from 1991 till 1995. He is on the editorial boards of Cluster Computing: The Journal of Networks, Software Tools and Applications, the International Journal on Parallel Programming, and the Journal of VLSI Signal Processing. He is also a past member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Parallel and Distributed Computing.



Jennifer C. Hou received the MSE degrees in electrical engineering and computer science and in information and opera-tions engineering in 1989 and 1991 and the PhD degree in electrical engineering and computer science in 1993, all from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She was an assistant professor in electrical and computer engineering at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, from 1993-1996, and an assistant/associate professor in electrical engineering at Ohio State University from 1996-2001. Since August 2001, she has been with the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, where she is currently an associate professor. She was a recipient of the Lumley Research Award from Ohio State University in 2001, the US National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award from the Network and Communications Research Infrastructure, NSF from 1996-2000, and the Women in Science Intiative Award from the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 1993-1995. She has served on the TPC of several major networking, real-time, and distributed systems conferences/symposiums and was the technical program chair of the IEEE Sixth Real-Time Technology and Applications Symposium in 2000, the general cochair of the same symposium in 2001, and a program vice-chair of the IEEE 22nd International Conference on Distributed Computing Systems in 2002. Her research interests are in the areas of protocol design, implementation, and analysis for QoS control, network modeling and simulation, distributed systems/applications, and real-time computing.



George Karypis received the PhD degree in 1996 and the BS degree in 1992, both in computer science, from the University of Minnesota. He is an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. He has served on the program committees of a number of conferences and workshops, including Supercomputing, IPDPS, ICPP, BIOKDD, SIAM data-mining conference, and the WWW conference. His research spans the areas of parallel processing, bioinformatics, data mining, scientific computing, electronic design automation, e-commerce, and information retrieval. His ongoing research on these topics has led to the development of various software packages such as METIS and ParMETIS for partitioning unstructured graphs and meshes, hMETIS for hypergraph/circuit partition-ing, CLUTO for clustering low and high-dimensional data sets, PAFI for finding patterns in transactional, sequential, and relational data sets, PSPASES for parallel Cholesky factorization, SUGGEST for collaborative filtering based recommendations, MGRIDGEN for multigrid coarse grid construction, and PILUT for parallel preconditioning. He has coauthored more than 80 journal and conference papers on these topics, including a widely-used textbook titled Introduction to Parallel Computing (second edition, Addison Wesley). In addition, he has given more than 25 invited talks and organized numerous tutorials.



Kwei-Jay Lin received the BS degree in electrical engineering from National Taiwan University in 1976, and the MS and PhD degrees in computer science from the University of Maryland, College Park, in 1980 and 1985, respectively. He is a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California, Irvine. He was an associate professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign before he joined UCI in 1993. His research inter-ests include real-time systems, scheduling theory, operating systems, and Web-based information systems. He has pub-lished more than 100 papers in academic journals and conference proceedings. He is a member of the executive committee of the IEEE Technical Committee on Real-Time Systems. He is a cochair of the IEEE Task Force on E-Commerce. He was an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on Computers from 1996-2000. He has served on program committees of many conferences and workshops. His most recent conference duties include the general chair of the 2003 IEEE Conference on E-Commerce, workshop chair of EEE'03 in Taipei, Taiwan, and program vice-chair for ICDCS 2004.



Koji Nakano received the BE, ME, and PhD degrees from the Department of Computer Science, Osaka University, Japan in 1987, 1989, and 1992, respectively. From 1992-1995, he was a research scientist at the Advanced Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd. In 1995, he joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology. In 2001, he moved to the School of Information Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, where he was an associate professor. Since 2003, he has been a full professor in the School of Engineering, Hiroshima University.



A. Yavuz Oruç received the PhD degree in electrical engineering from Syracuse University in 1983. He is a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park. He recently served as the director of the Computer Systems Architecture Program within the Division of Computer and Communications Research at the US National Science Foundation (NSF). He previously held positions in the Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering Department at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Institute for Advanced Computer Studies at the University of Maryland, and Computer Science Department at Bilkent University in Turkey. He has been an active participant in parallel processing and networking research during the last 20 years. He supervised 14 PhD dissertations and 21 master's theses in these areas. His research has been published in several archival journals, including the IEEE Transactions on Computers, Communications, Information Theory, Parallel and Distributed Systems, and VLSI Systems. During his term at the NSF, he led the "molecular architectures" research initiative and helped organize the first NSF workshop on molecular architectures. His more recent work has been in the area of software design and development for computer architecture education. He designed the CodeMill instruction set architecture to integrate graphics operations into machine levels of processors, and cowrote the simulator for this architecture. This work was recognized by the University of Maryland's "Innovation in Teaching with Technology" Award in 2000. The CodeMill software is used in computer organization courses at the University of Maryland and to teach computer science with a computer architecture emphasis in several high schools in Maryland.



Cauligi S. Raghavendra received the BSc (Hons) physics degree from Bangalore University in 1973, and the BE and ME de-grees in electronics and communication from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, in 1976 and 1978, respectively. He received the PhD degree in computer science from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1982. He is a professor of electrical engineering and computer science and director of the Computer Engineering Division in the Electrical Engineering Department at the University of Southern California (USC), Los Angeles. Previously, he was a faculty member of the Department of Electrical Engineering-Systems at USC from 1982-1992, Boeing Chair Professor of Computer Engi-neering in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Washington State University in Pullman from 1992-1997, and with the Aerospace Corporation from August 1997-2001. His research interests are wireless and sensor networks, energy efficient algorithms and protocols, active networks, and autonomic distributed computing. He is a recipient of the Presidential Young Investigator Award for 1985 and became a fellow of the IEEE in 1997.



Anand Sivasubramaniam received the Btech degree in computer science from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, in 1989, and the MS and PhD degrees in computer science from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1991 and 1995, respectively. He has been on the faculty at The Pennsylvania State University since Fall 1995, where he is currently an associate professor. His research interests are in computer architecture, operating systems, performance evaluation, and applications for both high performance computer systems and embedded systems. His research has been funded by the US National Science Foundation through several grants, including the CAREER award, and from industries including IBM, Microsoft, and Unisys Corp. In addition to these industries, he has collaborated extensively with researchers at Lawrence Livermore, Argonne, and Los Alamos (where is currently a guest scientist) National Laboratories. He has several publications in leading journals and conferences and also serves on the editorial board of the IEEE Transactions on Computers. He is a recipient of a 2002 IBM Faculty Award and a 2003 Penn State Department of Computer Science and Engineering Faculty Teaching Award. He is a member of the IEEE, IEEE Computer Society, and ACM.



Jaideep Srivastava received the Btech degree in computer science from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India, in 1983, and the MS and PhD degrees, both in computer science, from the University of California, Berkeley in 1985 and 1988, respectively. Since 1988, he has been on the faculty of the University of Minnesota, where he is a full professor. For more than 15 years he has been active as a researcher, educator, consultant, and invited speaker in the areas of data mining, databases, artificial intelligence, and multimedia. He established and led a database, data mining, and multimedia research laboratory which has graduated 16 PhD and 37 MS students and, in the process, published more than 145 papers in journals and conferences. In support of this research and development activity, he secured research grants from federal agencies and industry. A number of these projects developed software that has been deployed in industry and the government. A specific example is the PADMA (PArallel Database MAnager) project that Dr. Srivastava initiated and led with a joint team consisting of scientists and engineers from C-DAC and Tata Unisys Ltd. during the period 1991-1993. Wide-ranging industry experience has provided him with a unique perspective on the use of the Internet and Web technologies to enhance the capability and efficiency of organizations. He is an often-invited participant in technical as well as technology strategy forums. He has given more than 100 talks in various industry, academic, and government forums. He is a senior member of the IEEE.



Ivan Stojmenovic received the BS and MS degrees in 1979 and 1983, respectively, from the University of Novi Sad (Yugoslavia/Serbia), and the PhD degree in mathematics in 1985 from the University of Zagreb (Yugoslavia/Croatia). Both the master's and PhD degrees were in multiple-valued logic field, an interdisciplinary area with discrete mathematics, computer science, and electrical engineering aspects. He worked at the Institute of Mathematics, University of Novi Sad, until 1987. During the winter of 1985-1986, he was a visiting researcher at the Electro-Technical Laboratory, Tsukuba, Japan. He spent Fall 1987 in the Computer Science Department, Washington State University, Pullman, while, in Winter and Spring 1988, he was at the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Miami, Miami, Florida. In Fall 1988, he joined the faculty in the Computer Science Department at the University of Ottawa, Canada, where he currently holds the position of full professor in SITE (School of Information Technology and Engineering). He has also held a research position at the IIMAS (Institute for Investigations in Applied Mathematics and Systems) of UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico) in Mexico City, Mexico, 2000-2002, University Picardie Jules Vernes, Amiens, France, June 1998, and LIFL, University of Lille, Lille, France, Springs 2002 and 2003. He has published more than 160 different papers in journals and conferences. His research interests include wireless ad hoc, sensor and cellular networks, parallel computing, interconnection networks, multiple-valued logic, evolutionary computing, neural networks, combinatorial algorithms, computational geometry, image processing, graph theory, and computer science education. He edited the Handbook of Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (John Wiley & Sons, 2002). He is coeditor (with S. Basagni, M. Conti, and S. Giordano) of Ad Hoc Networking (IEEE Press, to be published in 2003). He is currently a managing editor of the Journal of Multiple-Valued Logic and Soft Computing and an editor of Parallel Processing Letters, IASTED International Journal of Parallel and Distributed Systems, Parallel Algorithms and Applications, and Tangenta.
14 ms
(Ver 2.0)

Marketing Automation Platform Marketing Automation Tool