The Community for Technology Leaders
RSS Icon
Subscribe
Issue No.03 - March (2003 vol.52)
pp: 257-259
Published by the IEEE Computer Society
I am pleased to welcome Nader Bagherzadeh, Loren Schwiebert, Mukesh Singhal, Anand Tripathi, Lonnie Welch, and Wang Yi, who are now joining the Editorial Board. Their biographical sketches highlight their accomplishments and areas of expertise. They are all internationally recognized in their fields and the journal is fortunate indeed to have these outstanding researchers as members of the Editorial Board. Dr. Bagherzadeh will help us handle papers in a variety of areas, including computer architecture, reconfigurable computing, VLSI chip design, and computer graphics. Dr. Schwiebert will help us handle papers in a variety of areas, including interconnection networks, wireless sensor networks, and multicasting. Dr. Singhal will help us handle papers in a variety of areas, including distributed systems, mobile computing, computer networks, computer security, and performance evaluation. Dr. Tripathi will help us handle papers in a variety of areas, including distributed computing, system security, fault-tolerant systems, and middleware systems for distributed applications. Dr. Welch will help us handle papers in a variety of areas, including real-time parallel and distributed systems. Dr. Yi will help us handle papers in a variety of areas, including formal techniques for the design and analysis of embedded systems, real time, and hybrid systems.
Viktor K. Prasanna
Editor-in-Chief

For information on obtaining reprints of this article, please send e-mail to: tc@computer.org, and reference IEEECS Log Number 117771.

Nader Bagherzadeh received the PhD degree in computer engineering from the University of Texas at Austin in 1987. Since 1988, he has been a faculty member in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of California, Irvine, where he is a professor and the chair. From 1980 to 1984, he worked for AT&T Bell Labs in Holmdel, New Jersey, designing systems for the 5ESS telephone switching system. From 1984 to 1987, he worked for the parallel processing groups at Burroughs and MCC in Austin, Texas. His research interests are in parallel processing, advanced computer architecture, computer graphics, and VLSI design. He is a senior member of the IEEE. He served as the general chair for the PACT `99 conference. Currently, he is the cochair of HPCA `03.

Loren Schwiebert received the BS degree in computer science (with a dual major in mathematics) from Heidelberg College, Tiffin, Ohio, and the MS and PhD degrees in computer and information science from the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Since 1995, he has been a faculty member at Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, where he is currently an associate professor in the Computer Science Department. He is a member of the IEEE, the IEEE Computer Society, and the ACM.

Mukesh Singhal received the Bachelor of Engineering degree in electronics and communication engineering with high distinction from the Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, India, in 1980 and the PhD degree in computer science from the University of Maryland, College Park, in May 1986. He is a full professor and Gartener Group Endowed Chair in Network Engineering in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Kentucky, Lexington. From 1986 to 2001, he was a faculty member in computer and information science at the Ohio State University. His current research interests include distributed systems, mobile computing, computertworks, computer security, and performance evaluation. He has published more than 160 refereed articles in these areas. He has coauthored three books titled Data and Computer Communications: Networking and Internetworking (CRC Press, 2001), Advanced Concepts in Operating Systems (McGraw-Hill, 1994), and Readings in Distributed Computing Systems (IEEE Computer Society Press, 1993). He is a fellow of the IEEE. He is currently serving on the editorial board of the IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering and Computer Networks. From 1998 to 2001, he served as the program director of the Operating Systems and Compilers Program at the US National Science Foundation.

Anand Tripathi received the PhD degree in electrical engineering from the University of Texas at Austin in 1980 and the BTech degree in electrical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, in 1972. He is a professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. From 1981 through 1984, he was a senior principal research scientist at the Honeywell Computer Science Center in Minneapolis. He joined the University of Minnesota in 1985. From 1995-1997, he served as a program director at the US National Science Foundation. He has served on the program committees of close to 40 conferences and workshops. He was the program chair for the 20th IEEE Symposium on Reliable Distributed Systems. He served as a vice-chair for the IEEE International Conference on Distributed Computing Systems in 1997. During 1999-2000, he served as a member of the editorial board of IEEE Concurrency and, currently, he is a member of the editorial board of IEEE Pervasive Computing. He is also serving as the editor for the Education Column of IEEE DS Online magazine. He was appointed a distinguished visitor of the IEEE Computer Society for 2000-2002. He was a coeditor of two special issues of the IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering (September and October 2001) on exception handling. Recently, he coedited a monogram titled Advances in Exception Handling Systems, published by Springer-Verlag as LNCS 2022. His current research interests include distributed computing, systems security, fault-tolerant systems, and middleware systems for distributed applications.

Lonnie R. Welch received the PhD degree in computer and information science from the Ohio State University in 1990. He is the director of the Center for Intelligent, Distributed, and Dependable Systems and the Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Stuckey, Jr. Professor in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Ohio University. As principal investigator of the DeSiDeRaTa project, he invented the dynamic path paradigm and accompanying middleware for distributed resource management of dynamic real-time systems. His research has been sponsored by the US National Science Foundation, the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the US Navy, NASA, and the US Army. He has held summer faculty fellow appointments with the US Army Research Office and the US Office of Naval Research and he served as a visiting research scientist at the Naval Surface Warfare Center. He received an "Aegis Excellence Award" from the United States Navy for his contributions in dynamic resource management to the High Performance Distributed Computing (HiPer-D) program. Dr. Welch is the founder of the International Workshop on Parallel and Distributed Real-Time Systems and the International Workshop on Real-Time Mission-Critical Systems; additionally, he coorganized the Dagstuhl Seminar on Stochastic and Dynamic Real-Time Systems. He has been a guest editor of numerous journal special issues, including the Journal of Real-Time Systems special issue on parallel and distributed real-time systems and the Journal of Parallel and Distributed Computing special issue on object-oriented real-time systems. He serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Parallel and Distributed Computing Practices and the International Journal of Computers and Applications. Dr. Welch has published more than 100 articles in professional conferences and journals.

Wang Yi received the PhD degree in computer science from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, in 1991. He is a full professor of real-time systems at Uppsala University, Sweden. He was a research fellow at Aalborg University, Denmark, from 1991 to 1992, a lecturer from 1992 to 1994, and an associate professor from 1995 to 2000 at Uppsala University. He has also held visiting positions at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, United Nation University (International Institute of Software Technology, Macau), and Real-Time Research Center at Malardalen University (Sweden). His research focuses on theories, methods, and tools for the design, verification, and implementation of distributed, embedded, and real-time systems. He has (co)authored more than 50 papers on these topics. His main scientific contributions include the initiation and development of UPPAAL, a software tool for modeling and verification of real-time systems, developed in collaboration with Aalborg University.
25 ms
(Ver 2.0)

Marketing Automation Platform Marketing Automation Tool