The Community for Technology Leaders
RSS Icon
Subscribe
Chicago, IL, USA USA
Sept. 24, 2012 to Sept. 28, 2012
ISBN: 978-1-4673-2783-1
pp: 211-220
Robyn R. Lutz , Department of Computer Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 USA
Jack H. Lutz , Department of Computer Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 USA
James I. Lathrop , Department of Computer Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 USA
Titus H. Klinge , Department of Computer Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 USA
Divita Mathur , Department of Genetics, Development, and Cell Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 USA
D. M. Stull , Department of Computer Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 USA
Taylor G. Bergquist , Department of Computer Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 USA
Eric R. Henderson , Department of Genetics, Development, and Cell Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 USA
ABSTRACT
DNA nanotechnology uses the information processing capabilities of nucleic acids to design self-assembling, programmable structures and devices at the nanoscale. Devices developed to date have been programmed to implement logic circuits and neural networks, capture or release specific molecules, and traverse molecular tracks and mazes. Here we investigate the use of requirements engineering methods to make DNA nanotechnology more productive, predictable, and safe. We use goal-oriented requirements modeling to identify, specify, and analyze a product family of DNA nanodevices, and we use PRISM model checking to verify both common properties across the family and properties that are specific to individual products. Challenges to doing requirements engineering in this domain include the error-prone nature of nanodevices carrying out their tasks in the probabilistic world of chemical kinetics, the fact that roughly a nanomole (a 1 followed by 14 0s) of devices are typically deployed at once, and the difficulty of specifying and achieving modularity in a realm where devices have many opportunities to interfere with each other. Nevertheless, our results show that requirements engineering is useful in DNA nanotechnology and that leveraging the similarities among nanodevices in the product family improves the modeling and analysis by supporting reuse.
INDEX TERMS
model checking, requirements modeling and analysis, DNA nan-otechnology, goal-oriented, product families
CITATION
Robyn R. Lutz, Jack H. Lutz, James I. Lathrop, Titus H. Klinge, Divita Mathur, D. M. Stull, Taylor G. Bergquist, Eric R. Henderson, "Requirements analysis for a product family of DNA nanodevices", RE, 2012, 2013 21st IEEE International Requirements Engineering Conference (RE), 2013 21st IEEE International Requirements Engineering Conference (RE) 2012, pp. 211-220, doi:10.1109/RE.2012.6345806
34 ms
(Ver 2.0)

Marketing Automation Platform Marketing Automation Tool