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Issue No.03 - May-June (2013 vol.11)
pp: 64-67
Mark Gondree , Naval Postgraduate School
Zachary N.J. Peterson , Naval Postgraduate School
Tamara Denning , University of Washington
ABSTRACT
The US Naval Postgraduate School and University of Washington each independently developed informal security-themed tabletop games. [d0x3d!] is a board game in which players collaborate as white-hat hackers, tasked to retrieve a set of valuable digital assets held by an adversarial network. Control-Alt-Hack is a card game in which three to six players act as white-hat hackers at a security consulting company. These games employ modest pedagogical objectives to expose broad audiences to computer security topics.
INDEX TERMS
Computer security, US Department of Defense, Information management, Games, Software development, Security, tabletop games, Computer security, US Department of Defense, Information management, Games, Software development, Security, [d0x3d!], Computer security, US Department of Defense, Information management, Games, Software development, Security, Control-Alt-Hack, computer security, cybersecurity, computer security education, board games, card games
CITATION
Mark Gondree, Zachary N.J. Peterson, Tamara Denning, "Security through play", IEEE Security & Privacy, vol.11, no. 3, pp. 64-67, May-June 2013, doi:10.1109/MSP.2013.69
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