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The Price of Privacy
Sept.-Oct. 2012 (vol. 10 no. 5)
pp. 79-81
Michael Lesk, Rutgers University
Simply declaring privacy to be a legal right doesn't provide any resources to enforce it. If privacy was an economic transaction, meaning that people pay for it, then their payments would provide resources to protect it. Would we have better privacy if people were paying for it directly rather than trying to get it via political campaigns?
Index Terms:
Privacy,Economics,Social implications of technology,Social factors,Legal factors,Electronic voting,privacy and economics,social implications of technology
Citation:
Michael Lesk, "The Price of Privacy," IEEE Security & Privacy, vol. 10, no. 5, pp. 79-81, Sept.-Oct. 2012, doi:10.1109/MSP.2012.133
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