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Least-Cost Avoiders in Online Fraud and Abuse
July/August 2010 (vol. 8 no. 4)
pp. 78-81
Benjamin Edelman, Harvard Business School
Web users face considerable fraud, malfeasance, and economic harm that system operators could prevent or mitigate. Although the legal system can respond, regulations have mixed results. The author examines the applicable legal rules that constrain online fraud and the economic underpinnings to identify whether those rules assign responsibility to the parties best positioned to take action.

1. Communications Decency Act, US Code, Title 47, section 230, 1996.
2. Zeran v. America Online, Federal Supplement, 3rd Series, vol. 129, 1997, p. 327 (US Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit).
3. Digital Millennium Copyright Act, US Code, Title 17, section 512(c), 1998.
4. Viacom et al. v. YouTube et al., US District Court, Southern District of New York, Case No. 1:07-cv-02103, Viacom's Reply to Defendants' Counterstatement to Viacom's Statement of Undisputed Facts in Support of its Motion for Partial Summary Judgment, 4 June 2010, paragraph 95.
5. Viacom et al. v. YouTube et al., US District Court, Southern District of New York, Case No. 1:07-cv-02103, Opinion and Order, 23 June 2010.
6. Goddard v. Google, US District Court, Northern District of California, Case No. 5:08-cv-02738-JF.

Index Terms:
online fraud, fraud regulations, Internet fraud, Communications Decency Act, Digital Millennium Copyright Act
Citation:
Benjamin Edelman, "Least-Cost Avoiders in Online Fraud and Abuse," IEEE Security & Privacy, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 78-81, July-Aug. 2010, doi:10.1109/MSP.2010.132
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