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Finding Faults
September/October 2005 (vol. 3 no. 5)
pp. 61-65
David Naccache, Departement d'Informatique, Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris, France
The injection of an error can, in fact, cause the leakage of confidential information. Often, the only way to attack strong cryptographic implementations is to attack the infrastructure upon which they are built. This infrastructure is most often the underlying operating system or middleware, but attacks can also be mounted directly against the hardware upon which the cryptographic implementation is being run. This issue's Crypto Corner describes some of the methods used to induce faults in systems and explains how such faults can be exploited to reveal secret information.
Index Terms:
fault tolerance, fault injection, error
Citation:
David Naccache, "Finding Faults," IEEE Security & Privacy, vol. 3, no. 5, pp. 61-65, Sept.-Oct. 2005, doi:10.1109/MSP.2005.122
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