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Issue No.06 - November-December (2003 vol.1)
pp: 8-13
ABSTRACT
<p><em>Addressing The Monoculture</em>, Greg Goth<div>A new term has bubbled out of the specialized arena of academic nomenclature and into the mainstream, from daily newspaper columns to transcripts of Congressional hearings. That term is "monoculture." According to some of the leading computer-security experts in the United States, the dominance of Microsoft's Windows operating system has created an unsafe monoculture, in which critical networks and applications are tied together by one OS, all vulnerable to the same attacks. And, in a spate of activities regarding Windows' place in critical operating environments, elected officials, engineers and advocates, and Microsoft defenders and detractors, have begun debating anew how-or if-stakeholders should hold Microsoft accountable for security flaws in its software.</div></p><p><em>Hacker Study: Aiding Security Measures Development?</em>, Benjamin J. Alfonsi<div>A new research initiative, the Hacker Wargame Research Project, is trying to get inside the hacker's mind. The initiative focuses on the factors that determine how hackers make their choices. This concentration on the hacker's internal decision-making process is equal parts technology and psychology, and represents a novel approach to studying how hackers think.</div></p>
CITATION
Greg Goth, Benjamin J. Alfonsi, "News", IEEE Security & Privacy, vol.1, no. 6, pp. 8-13, November-December 2003, doi:10.1109/MSECP.2003.1253561
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