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Issue No.02 - April-June (2010 vol.9)
pp: 11-17
John Waters , Hewlett-Packard Laboratories
Weng Wah Loh , Hewlett-Packard Laboratories
Robert Castle , Hewlett-Packard Laboratories
Fraser Dickin , Hewlett-Packard Laboratories
J.T. Edward McDonnell , Hewlett-Packard Laboratories
Keir Shepherd , Hewlett-Packard Laboratories
ABSTRACT
Unlike traditional RFID and bar codes, the batteryless Memory Spot allows reading, writing, and appending of megabytes of digital content at an on-air data rate of 10 Mbps. Besides providing physical objects with locally stored digital content, Memory Spot can contain links to Web-based content in the same way as RFID. Enabling applications synthesized from local and remote data components provides both compelling utility and an excellent user experience. In addition, having a significant amount of locally accessible content significantly reduces the possibility of service degradations arising from latencies and inaccessibility of the wireless access network and back-end servers. The article addresses the technology's underpinnings; discusses the innovations in its antenna, modem design, processor, and security engine; and describes some applications.
INDEX TERMS
labeling, bar codes, RFID, pervasive computing, Internet of Things
CITATION
John Waters, Weng Wah Loh, Robert Castle, Fraser Dickin, J.T. Edward McDonnell, Keir Shepherd, "Memory Spot: A Labeling Technology", IEEE Pervasive Computing, vol.9, no. 2, pp. 11-17, April-June 2010, doi:10.1109/MPRV.2010.16
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