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Culturally Embedded Computing
January-March 2004 (vol. 3 no. 1)
pp. 14-21
Phoebe Sengers, Cornell University
Joseph Kaye, Cornell University
Kirsten Boehner, Cornell University
Jeremiah Fairbank, Cornell University
Geri Gay, Cornell University
Yevgeniy Medynskiy, Cornell University
Susan Wyche, Cornell University

Culturally embedded computing describes one vision of human-computer interaction (HCI) that situates embedded computing not only in the physical world but also explicitly in society, individual experience, culture, and history. Five projects explore alternatives to traditional HCI design and evaluation inspired by this shift in emphasis. These projects highlight approaches to technology design that support critical reflection on the role of technology in society. Designed for fuzzy aspects of personal experience, the projects contextualize technology with reference to culture and history. In particular, the design of ubiquitous devices is part of a longer history of technologies for the home. Through an interdisciplinary approach, the project team is developing algorithms, devices, and user studies that situate technology within its broader meaning for human life.

Index Terms:
HCI, Arts, User-centered design, social issues, ubiquitous computing, design methodology
Citation:
Phoebe Sengers, Joseph Kaye, Kirsten Boehner, Jeremiah Fairbank, Geri Gay, Yevgeniy Medynskiy, Susan Wyche, "Culturally Embedded Computing," IEEE Pervasive Computing, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 14-21, Jan.-March 2004, doi:10.1109/MPRV.2004.1269124
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