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Tell Me a Story
January-March 2012 (vol. 19 no. 1)
pp. 4, 6
Aisling Kelliher, Arizona State University
Malcolm Slaney, Yahoo Research and Stanford CCRMA

Multimedia offers researchers developing tools, methods, and frameworks an intuitive and cross-cultural application space with a diverse set of motivated end users. As we progress from shoeboxes of Hi8 tapes to terabyte drives filled with rarely viewed media directories, the challenges continue to grow. What is truly significant in this collection? What meaningful patterns could emerge to help me shape my argument as I present my slideshow to the board? How best can I craft a heartfelt eulogy for a family member to share with relatives abroad? For now, such scenarios continue to remain a largely human-driven endeavor, but the opportunity for stimulating, augmenting, and enhancing these efforts with computational support structures presents an intriguing possibility space. This article argues that storytelling is a much more integral aspect of multimedia than most of researchers consider.

Index Terms:
multimedia, multimedia applications, storytelling, summarization
Citation:
Aisling Kelliher, Malcolm Slaney, "Tell Me a Story," IEEE Multimedia, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 4, 6, Jan.-March 2012, doi:10.1109/MMUL.2012.13
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