Evolution
March/April 2012 (Vol. 32, No. 2) pp. 2
0272-1732/12/$31.00 © 2012 IEEE

Published by the IEEE Computer Society
Micro Evolution
Erik R. Altman, ealtman@us.ibm.com
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This column discusses changes to IEEE Micro, including possible future developments such as an all-digital format and broadening the magazine's scope.

This issue contains a collection of exciting articles adapted from the 2011 Hot Chips conference. Guest Editors Allen Baum and Bevan Baas have done a fine job in selecting and shepherding a set of papers featuring major new offerings from leading manufacturers, as well as smaller and more narrowly targeted offerings showcasing new architectural ideas.
If you are reading this online, you may have noticed a change we began in the January/February issue: color throughout instead of just the first eight pages. For those of you reading our print edition, you might want to take a look at what you are missing: http://www.computer.org/micro.
Indeed, IEEE Micro is looking at other digital options, including the possibility of going all digital in the future. In addition to color, digital could bring additional advantages such as more multimedia content where appropriate—for example, author podcasts, animated content such as processor heat maps over time, and the ability to more easily refer back to previous IEEE Micro articles. For readers outside North America, digital could also provide more timely delivery. Widespread use of the digital version would also make it clearer which articles are most popular, and thus let us better focus the magazine on topics of interest to our readers.
However, we also realize that many readers prefer the convenience of the current print format. Indeed, in our latest reader survey last fall, more than 70 percent of readers indicated that they preferred print to digital, a fact of major importance to us. However, the survey size is fairly small, and I would appreciate hearing from more of you. Please e-mail me your thoughts on digital IEEE Micro or any other comments you have about the magazine (ealtman@us.ibm.com).
A related question is scope. IEEE Micro tries to cover topics broadly related to microarchitecture, both through appropriate theme issues and general contributions. However, the magazine has not had a large focus historically on things like components and assemblies or on instrumentation and control equipment, something that many readers in our survey indicated they would like to see. Thus, the Editorial Board and I are considering appropriate actions in this domain, too. As with issues of digital versus print, I welcome hearing directly from you how we can continue to make IEEE Micro as valuable as possible.
Nonetheless, I think that in both this issue and upcoming issues, we will have many interesting and informative articles for your reading.
Enjoy!
Erik R. Altman
Editor in Chief
IEEE Micro