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Keith W. Miller, University of Illinois at Springfield
Job titles and functions shift quickly in the IT world, but some broad classifications can be useful for identifying what people do and how they view themselves. In some ways, the category of "IT professional" is the most broadly encompassing, but many people identify more closely with subspecialties such as "software engineer" or "computer scientist."

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Index Terms:
computer science, computer scientist, IT, information technology, IT careers, jobs, engineering, IT professional
Citation:
Keith W. Miller, Jeffrey Voas, "Computer Scientist, Software Engineer, or IT Professional: Which Do You Think You Are?," IT Professional, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 4-6, July-Aug. 2008, doi:10.1109/MITP.2008.64
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