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Usefulness Is Not Trustworthiness
May/June 2011 (vol. 15 no. 3)
pp. 79-80
Landon P. Cox, Duke University

Mobile phones have placed communication, sensing, and computation at the center of nearly all human activity. A great deal of the software written for this new platform is extraordinarily fun and useful. However, the question of how much of it we can trust remains unanswered.

1. W. Enck et al., "TaintDroid: An Information-Flow Tracking System for Realtime Privacy Monitoring on Smartphones," Proc. 9th Usenix Conf. Operating Systems Design and Implementation (OSDI 10), Usenix Assoc., 2010, pp. 1–6.
2. J.P. Anderson, Computer Security Technology Planning Study Volume II, tech. report ESD-TR-73-51, vol. 2, Electronic Systems Division, Air Force Systems Command, Oct. 1972.
3. M. Egele et al., "PiOS: Detecting Privacy Leaks in iOS Applications," Proc. 18th Ann. Network and Distributed System Security Symp. (NDSS 11), 2011; www.mylookout.com.

Index Terms:
mobile devices, privacy, Internet computing
Citation:
Landon P. Cox, "Usefulness Is Not Trustworthiness," IEEE Internet Computing, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 79-80, May-June 2011, doi:10.1109/MIC.2011.69
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