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The Myth of Open Web Services: The Rise of the Service Parks
May/June 2008 (vol. 12 no. 3)
pp. 96, 94-95
Charles Petrie, Stanford University
Christoph Bussler, Merced Systems
Issues of trust, reliability, and data heterogeneity make it unlikely that we'll have access to a set of free and heterogenous Web services and tools to combine them on the Internet anytime soon. The authors contend, instead, that "service parks" will rise and succeed in the near future as execution environments that support simplified data integration and service reliability. As service park owners establish and leverage branding of their efforts, they will likely build trust within the Web service user community. The most successful service parks will allow users and service providers other than the park owners to to be easily provide and modify services.

1. E.S. Raymond, The Cathedral and the Bazaar, O'Reilly, 2001; www.catb.org/~esr/writingscathedral-bazaar /.
2. C. Petrie, "It's the Programming, Stupid," IEEE Internet Computing, vol. 10, no. 3, 2006, pp. 95–96.
3. C. Petrie and C. Bussler, "Industrial Semantics and Magic," IEEE Internet Computing, vol. 10, no. 4, 2006, pp. 94–96.

Index Terms:
peering, Web services, integration, software-as-a-service, SaaS, service parks, service composition, service-oriented architecture, SOA
Citation:
Charles Petrie, Christoph Bussler, "The Myth of Open Web Services: The Rise of the Service Parks," IEEE Internet Computing, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 96, 94-95, May-June 2008, doi:10.1109/MIC.2008.65
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