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Putting the "Web" into Web Services: Interaction Models, Part 2
July/August 2002 (vol. 6 no. 4)
pp. 90-92

As I discussed in my previous column, each different style of middleware promotes one or more interaction models that determine how applications based on that middleware communicate and work with each other. In the relatively simple publish-subscribe model, for example, source publishes information, perhaps by postingto a message queue, and subscribers interested in that information either retrieve it from the queue or receive it automatically from a broker. Complex interaction models, on the other hand, often arise in distributed object systems, in which stateful objectsrely on clients to properly manipulate their state through sequences of method invocations.

Citation:
Steve Vinoski, "Putting the "Web" into Web Services: Interaction Models, Part 2," IEEE Internet Computing, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 90-92, July-Aug. 2002, doi:10.1109/MIC.2002.1020331
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