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Issue No.02 - March-April (2013 vol.28)
pp: 22-30
Angela Charng-Rurng Tsai , National Taiwan University
Chi-En Wu , Yuan Ze University
Richard Tzong-Han Tsai , Yuan Ze University
Jane Yung-jen Hsu , National Taiwan University
ABSTRACT
Sentiment dictionaries are essential for research in the sentiment analysis field. A two-step method integrates iterative regression and random walk with in-link normalization to build a concept-level sentiment dictionary. The approach uses ConceptNet as a framework to propagate sentiment values, based on the assumption that semantically related concepts share a common sentiment.
INDEX TERMS
Knowledge discovery, Data mining, Emotion recognition, Information analysis, Knowledge discovery, Iterative methods, Data collection, Dictionaries, Context awareness, Natural language processing, commonsense knowledge, Knowledge discovery, Data mining, Emotion recognition, Information analysis, Knowledge discovery, Iterative methods, Data collection, Dictionaries, Context awareness, Natural language processing, ConceptNet, sentiment analysis, sentiment dictionary
CITATION
Angela Charng-Rurng Tsai, Chi-En Wu, Richard Tzong-Han Tsai, Jane Yung-jen Hsu, "Building a Concept-Level Sentiment Dictionary Based on Commonsense Knowledge", IEEE Intelligent Systems, vol.28, no. 2, pp. 22-30, March-April 2013, doi:10.1109/MIS.2013.25
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