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Issue No.06 - November/December (2001 vol.16)
pp: 2-3
ABSTRACT
<p>I recently gave an introductory lecture on AI to first-year students. We reviewed some of the major trends and controversies, and developments and setbacks, of our 40-to-50-year-old discipline. It is easy to forget that these. students have been alive for less than half of AI?s history. Most were born around 1983--a point in computing history when we were between Intel?s 286 and 386 technologies. In other words, when we could integrate between 120,000 and 275,000 transistors on a circuit. Moore's law has pretty much held, so now we live in an age where the Pentium 4 processor packs in 42 million components. Whatever your favorite measure, computational resource has more or less doubled every 12 to 18 months through-out our subject?s history. </p>
CITATION
Nigel Shadbolt, "Brute Force and Insight", IEEE Intelligent Systems, vol.16, no. 6, pp. 2-3, November/December 2001, doi:10.1109/MIS.2001.10020
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