November/December 2012 (Vol. 14, No. 6) pp. 4
1521-9615/12/$31.00 © 2012 IEEE

Published by the IEEE Computer Society
Hail and Farewell
Isabel Beichl, Editor in Chief
  Article Contents  
Download Citation
   
Download Content
 
PDFs Require Adobe Acrobat
 

Isabel Beichl bids farewell as the Editor in Chief of CiSE, welcomes incoming EIC George Thiruvathukal, and discusses what the future may hold for the field of computational science and engineering.

AVE ATQUE VALE. THESE THREE FAMOUS WORDS OF THE LATIN POET CATULLUS ADDRESSED TO THE MEMORY OF HIS LATE BROTHER ARE PROBABLY A BIT OVER THE TOP FOR MY PURPOSE—SAYING FAREWELL TO THE JOB OF EDITOR IN CHIEF OF CiSE—BUT THEY DO HAVE A NICE RHYTHM.
Like everyone I know, I've had life experiences that beforehand seemed as though they would require taking a very big step, such as starting college, starting a "real" job, getting married, and so on. For me one huge step was entering the third grade. I had been warned by older kids that third grade would be rough. But most big steps turn out to be not as traumatic as feared, because what the doomsayers don't tell you is that you'll receive help along the way. And, happily, that was the case for the big step I took when I agreed to serve as EIC of CiSE.
So, before placing CiSE in the capable hands of my friend and energetic colleague George K. Thiruvathukal, my first duty is to thank all of those who helped make my stint as EIC an enjoyable and rewarding experience.
The staff at the IEEE Computer Society were amazingly encouraging and patient as I learned the ropes of "running a magazine." They've been there for me as I struggled with the mechanics of getting papers through the receive, review, report, and publish process. Issues that looked like they would be real problems were often cleared up via short phone conversations. Others that might actually have been complex were cleared up by some behind-the-scenes actions that still remain mysterious to me, as they probably should.
Staff at the American Institute of Physics (AIP) headquarters in College Park, Maryland have been more than generous, with many kinds of help and occasional use of their facilities.
The members of the CiSE Editorial Board—acting both individually and as a committee—have, in reality, done more to keep CiSE relevant, interesting, and lively than anyone can imagine. They've suggested topics to pursue and special issues to seek, advised me on the best way to engage with the many communities interested in the content of CiSE, and provided insight on how best to organize the interaction between a print vehicle (such as CiSE) and other media (such as the Web and its many offspring).
Custom dictates that I should add a few words about where we are and what the future may hold. It's a safe bet that uses of digital computing in science and engineering will continue to enjoy the same explosive growth that's been observed for more than 50 years. My guess is that languages and user interfaces will make the use of computing ever more natural and productive. But, at the same time, the complexity of computer architectures will make advanced training imperative for those who hope to make full use of software and hardware tools. As specialists in computational science and engineering, we must continue to take responsibility for providing this training. The era when scientific computing dominated the computing industry is long past, probably never to return. But the requirements of the consumer market will continue to provide large benefits to users of computing for science and engineering.
Finally, I want to say thanks to all the readers and reviewers. I wish you all continued success.