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Issue No.04 - July/August (2012 vol.14)
pp: 18-25
Claudio T. Silva , Polytechnic Institute of New York University
ABSTRACT
The VisTrails system supports the creation of reproducible experiments. VisTrails integrates data acquisition, derivation, analysis, and visualization as executable components throughout the scientific exploration process, and through systematic provenance capture, it makes it easier to generate and share reproducible results. Using VisTrails, authors can link results to their provenance, reviewers can assess the experiment's validity, and readers can repeat and utilize the computations.
INDEX TERMS
Data visualization, Reproducibility of results, Research and development, Scientific computing, Programming, Systematics, open science, Data visualization, Reproducibility of results, Research and development, Scientific computing, Programming, Systematics, scientific computing, reproducible publications, provenance, scientific workflows
CITATION
Claudio T. Silva, "Making Computations and Publications Reproducible with VisTrails", Computing in Science & Engineering, vol.14, no. 4, pp. 18-25, July/August 2012, doi:10.1109/MCSE.2012.76
REFERENCES
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