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Issue No.01 - January/February (2011 vol.13)
pp: 22-30
Wei Wang , National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder
Steven Cavallo , National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder
James Done , National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder
Jimy Dudhia , National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder
Sherrie Fredrick , National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder
John Michalakes , National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder
Ginger Caldwell , National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder
Thomas Engel , National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder
Ryan Torn , University at Albany SUNY, Albany
ABSTRACT
<p>Widely varying scales of atmospheric motion make it extremely difficult to predict hurricane intensity, even after decades of research. A new model capable of resolving a hurricane's deep convection motions was tested on a large sample of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Results show that using finer resolution can improve storm intensity predictions.</p>
INDEX TERMS
Hurricanes, high-performance computing, numerical weather prediction, scientific computing
CITATION
Wei Wang, Steven Cavallo, James Done, Jimy Dudhia, Sherrie Fredrick, John Michalakes, Ginger Caldwell, Thomas Engel, Ryan Torn, "High-Resolution Hurricane Forecasts", Computing in Science & Engineering, vol.13, no. 1, pp. 22-30, January/February 2011, doi:10.1109/MCSE.2010.74
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