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March/April 2007 (vol. 9 no. 2)
pp. 3-7
Pam Frost Gorder, Freelance Writer
Today, practically every new computer has a dual-core (two-CPU) chip, and Intel just launched a quad-core chip with four CPUs. One of 2006's most in-demand holiday gifts was Sony's PlayStation 3, which boasts a "cell" chip with nine CPUs for faster and more realistic video gaming. Multicore systems might offer advantages to gamers, but what about researchers? Making the most of multicore systems will require new tools, new algorithms, and a new way of looking at programming.
Index Terms:
multicore, CPU, chip speed, processors
Citation:
Pam Frost Gorder, "Multicore Processors for Science and Engineering," Computing in Science and Engineering, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 3-7, March-April 2007, doi:10.1109/MCSE.2007.35
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