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May/June 2005 (vol. 7 no. 3)
pp. 3-6
Call it yet another biological gold rush. When Charles Darwin published The Origin of Species in 1859, scientists began working in earnest to document the world's plant and animal species and build a phylogeny—a map of how all those species relate to each other. More scientists came to the discipline in the 1980s, when automated DNA sequencing offered a new way to classify species and new applications for phylogenetics. Today, the newest prospectors in the gold rush are those with enough expertise in computing to connect all that genetic data in a meaningful way. The goal is the same as it was 150 years ago: build the ultimate family tree.
Index Terms:
phylogeny, biology, tree of life
Citation:
Pam Frost Gorder, "Computing Life's Family Tree," Computing in Science and Engineering, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 3-6, May-June 2005, doi:10.1109/MCSE.2005.48
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