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November/December 2003 (vol. 5 no. 6)
pp. 3-5

For particular classes of problems that we can state as generalizations of finding the period of a discrete function or locating an item on a discrete list, quantum computing promises a dramatic speedup over classical machines. Quantum computing has had a stimulating effect on the theory of computing, generated some excellent thinking about the foundations of quantum mechanics, and justified some elegant experimental work in applied physics. But, as was probably inevitable, it also has generated some myths. I think the myths actually affect public perception of what?s possible in computing technology and, by implication, can lead to wild overestimates of what to expect from computational science.

Index Terms:
quantum computing
Citation:
Francis Sullivan, "From the Editors: Ask the Hard Questions," Computing in Science and Engineering, vol. 5, no. 6, pp. 3-5, Nov.-Dec. 2003, doi:10.1109/MCISE.2003.1238695
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