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DNA Computing
May/June 2002 (vol. 4 no. 3)
pp. 5-8

Can biomolecules compute? As far back as 1945, physicist Erwin Schroedinger described the molecular nature of the gene in information-theoretic terms in his book What Is Life? (What Is Life? The Physical Aspect of the Living Cell, Cambridge University Press, 1945). Now, nearly 60 years later, computer scientists are joining forces with molecular biologists and chemists to explore the potential for computation using information-carrying biological polymers such as nucleic acids (DNA and RNA). "DNA computing is a subset of molecular computing," says Nadrian C. Seeman, a chemist at New York University. "The key feature of DNA for computing is its information content."

Citation:
David I. Lewin, "DNA Computing," Computing in Science and Engineering, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 5-8, May-June 2002, doi:10.1109/5992.998634
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