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The Crucial 0.1 Percent Difference
May/June 2001 (vol. 3 no. 3)
pp. 104-C3
Human beings, equipped with more genes than lesser creatures, are consequently smarter than other beasts. Right? Wrong. A frantic competition between two philosophies for deciphering the entire human genome has, in one of its important accomplishments, deflated this long-standing presumption. Both competitors agree on an estimate that humans have about 30,000 genes, which is roughly the same as a mouse's inventory of genes and well below earlier estimates of as much as 100,000 human genes. Furthermore, humans possess only 300 genes not found in mice.
Citation:
Norris Parker Smith, "The Crucial 0.1 Percent Difference," Computing in Science and Engineering, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 104-C3, May-June 2001, doi:10.1109/MCSE.2001.10005
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