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Issue No.04 - April (2011 vol.44)
pp: 71-73
Published by the IEEE Computer Society
Bob Ward , IEEE Computer Society
ABSTRACT
Georgia Tech’s Ian F. Akyildiz is the 2011 winner of the IEEE Computer Society’s prestigious W. Wallace McDowell Award. The McDowell Award is given to individuals for outstanding recent theoretical, design, educational, practical, or other innovative contributions in the field of computing.
Akyildiz Wins W. Wallace McDowell Award
Georgia Tech's Ian F. Akyildiz is the 2011 winner of the IEEE Computer Society's prestigious W. Wallace McDowell Award. The McDowell Award is given to individuals for outstanding recent theoretical, design, educational, practical, or other innovative contributions in the field of computing. Akyildiz was recognized "for pioneering contributions to wireless sensor network architectures and communication protocols."
Akyildiz is the director of Georgia Tech's Broadband and Wireless Networking Laboratory. He has held visiting professorships at the Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María in Chile; Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris VI) and Ecole Nationale Supérieure Télécommunications in Paris; Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña in Barcelona, Spain; and Universitat de les Illes Balears in Palma de Mallorca, Spain. He is the editor in chief of Computer Networks (Elsevier) as well as the founding editor in chief of Ad Hoc Networks (Elsevier). He is a past editor for IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, Kluwer's Journal of Cluster Computing, ACM-Springer's Multimedia Systems, IEEE Transactions on Computers, and ACM-Springer's Wireless Networks.


Ian F. Akyildiz is the Ken Byers Chair Professor in Telecommunications at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Akyildiz was the technical program chair of the Ninth IEEE Computer Communications workshop, ACM MobiCom 1996, IEEE InfoCom 1998, and IEEE ICC 2003. He was the general chair for ACM MobiCom 2002 and cofounded the ACM SenSys Conference. Akyildiz serves on the advisory board of several research centers, journals, conferences, and publication companies. He received a BS, MS, and PhD in computer engineering from the University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany.
Other Recent Winners
Jiawei Han, computer science professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, was the 2009 winner of the McDowell Award for his research into data mining, information network analysis, data warehousing, stream mining, spatiotemporal and multimedia data mining, text and Web mining, and software bug mining. Han has received IBM Faculty Awards, an HP Innovation Award, the 2002 International Conference on Data Mining's Outstanding Contribution Award, a 2004 ACM SIGKDD Innovation Award, and a 2005 IEEE Computer Society Technical Achievement Award.
Rice University computer scientist Krishna Palem, also head of the Institute of Sustainable Nanoelectronics at Singapore's Nanyang Technological University, was the recipient of the 2008 McDowell Award for his pioneering contributions to the growing field of embedded computing.
W. Wallace Mcdowell Award
W. Wallace McDowell spent decades working for IBM and directed development of the first commercial electronic calculator. He was later responsible for developing other major advances, including IBM's card-programmed calculator, magnetic drums and tape units, magnetic core and disc storage, the company's "700" systems, and the Naval Ordinance Research Calculator.
One of computing's most highly sought-after individual honors, the McDowell Award has a list of past winners that includes Intel Corp. cofounder Gordon Moore (1978); microprocessor inventor Federico Faggin (1994); World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee (1996); Lotus Notes creator and Microsoft chief software architect Ray Ozzie (2000); supercomputer pioneers Seymour Cray (1968), Gene Amdahl (1976), and Ken Kennedy (1995); and Frederick Brooks, the architect of IBM's mainframe computer (1970).
The W. Wallace McDowell Award is given for a single contribution of great merit or a series of lesser contributions that have had or are expected to have an important influence on the computer field. The award consists of a bronze medal and a $2,000 honorarium. For more information, visit www.computer.org/portal/web/awards/wallace.
Computer Society Honors Five Top Experts
Five technologists who have made outstanding and innovative contributions to the fields of computer and information science and engineering or computer technology will receive 2011 IEEE Computer Society Technical Achievement Awards.
The recipients are Frederica Darema of the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research; Ronald Fagin of IBM's Almaden Research Center; Jose Garcia-Luna-Aceves of the University of California, Santa Cruz, and Palo Alto Research Center; Johannes Gehrke of Cornell University; and Liang-Jie Zhang of Kingdee International Software Group.
Frederica Darema
Frederica Darema is director of mathematics, information, and life sciences at the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. She is a graduate of the University of Athens, the Illinois Institute of Technology, and the University of California, Davis, where she attended as a Fulbright Scholar and a Distinguished Scholar.
After serving in physics research associate positions at the University of Pittsburgh and Brookhaven National Laboratory, Darema became a technical staff member in the nuclear sciences department at Schlumberger-Doll Research. She worked at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center as a research staff member and group manager and also served in the IBM Corporate Strategy Group.
From 1996 to 1998, Darema held a two-year interagency assignment at the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Prior to her current assignment, she was a senior science and technology adviser and senior science analyst at the US National Science Foundation.
Darema's award citation reads, "For pioneering contributions to Novel Techniques for Complex Systems Modeling and Simulation."
Ronald Fagin
Ronald Fagin is manager of the Foundations of Computer Science group at the IBM Almaden Research Center and is a member of the IBM Academy of Technology. He received a BA in mathematics from Dartmouth College, and a PhD in mathematics from the University of California, Berkeley. He is a Fellow of IEEE, the AAAS, and the ACM. He was named Docteur Honoris Causa by the University of Paris, and a "highly cited researcher" by the Institute for Scientific Information). Faginhas won best paper awards at the 1985 International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, the 2001 ACM Symposium on Principles of Database Systems, and the 2010 International Conference on Database Theory. He was the winner of the 2004 ACM SIGMOD Edgar F. Codd Innovations Award, a lifetime achievement award in database sciences, for "fundamental contributions to database theory."
Fagin's award citation reads, "For pioneering contributions to the Theory of Rank and Score Aggregation."
Jose Garcia-Luna-Aceves
Jose Garcia-Luna-Aceves received a BS in electrical engineering from the Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City, and an MS and PhD in electrical engineering from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. He holds the Jack Baskin Endowed Chair of Computer Engineering at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where he serves as chair of the computer engineering department, and is a principal scientist at the Palo Alto Research Center. Prior to joining UCSC, Garcia-Luna-Aceves was a center director at SRI International. He has been a visiting professor at Sun Laboratories and a principal of protocol design at Nokia. His research focuses on computer communication.
Garcia-Luna-Aceves is a Fellow of IEEE, the AAAS, and the ACM. He holds 35 US patents, has published three books and more than 400 journal and conference papers, and has supervised more than 30 PhD dissertations.
Garcia-Luna-Aceves' award citation reads, "For pioneering contributions to the Theory and Design of Com-munication Protocols for Ad-hoc Wireless Networks."
Johannes Gehrke
Johannes Gehrke is a computer science professor at Cornell University. His research interests are in the areas of database systems, data mining, and data privacy. Gehrke has received a National Science Foundation Career Award; an Arthur P. Sloan Fellowship; an IBM Faculty Award; the Cornell College of Engineering James and Mary Tien Excellence in Teaching Award; the Cornell University Provost's Award for Distinguished Scholarship; a Faculty Development Award from the New York State Foundation for Science, Technology, and Innovation; and a Humboldt Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.
With Raghu Ramakrishnan, Gehrke coauthored an undergraduate textbook, Database Management Systems (McGraw-Hill, 2002), used at universities all over the world. He is also an adjunct faculty member at Norway's University of Troms⊘ and a visiting researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Software Systems. From 2007 to 2008, he was chief scientist at FAST, a Microsoft subsidiary.
Gehrke's award citation reads, "For pioneering contribution to Novel Data Mining and Distributed Query Processing Techniques."
Liang-Jie Zhang
Zhang is a senior vice president, chief scientist, and director of research at Kingdee International Software Group. Prior to this position, he was a research staff member and program manager of application architectures and realization at IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, where he led the R&D of the custom solution engagement cloud. He was also the worldwide leader of IBM's SOMA Modeling Environment.
Zhang, editor in chief of IEEE Transactions on Services Computing, received an Outstanding Achievement Award from the World Academy of Sciences and an Innovation Leadership Award from the Chinese Institute of Electronics. He holds 40 patents and has more than 20 pending patent applications. Zhang received a PhD in pattern recognition and intelligent control from Tsinghua University. He is an IEEE Fellow and an ACM Distinguished Scientist. Currently, Zhang is a director of the Governing Board of The Open Group.
Zhang's award citation reads, "For pioneering contributions to Application Design Techniques in Services Computing."
Technical Achievement Award
To be eligible for a Technical Achievement Award, a nominee's contributions must have been made in the past 10 to 15 years and have significantly promoted technical progress in the field. The award consists of a certificate and $2,000 honorarium. The next nomination deadline is 15 October 2011. For more information, including nomination forms, visit www.computer.org/portal/web/awards/technicalachievement.
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