The Community for Technology Leaders
RSS Icon
Subscribe
Issue No.07 - July (2004 vol.37)
pp: 4
Published by the IEEE Computer Society
WHO IS LIABLE FOR INSECURE SYSTEMS?, PP. 27-34
Nancy R. Mead
Over the past several years, we have seen both the enactment of legislation affecting liability and the appearance of actual liability cases in the courts.
Although several software flaws can make systems insecure, an entire industry including software vendors, systems administrators, consultants, network technicians, and clearing houses has developed to try to mitigate security holes after the fact.
Nevertheless, the issue of liability lurks just beneath the surface of all their activities. Although the courts may not be the best venue for resolving this, liability cases will take place and an evolution of best practices will occur as well.
ISSUES IN HIGH-SPEED INTERNET SECURITY, PP. 36-43
Peder Jungck and Simon S.Y. Shim
Over the past decade, the threat of computer worms and viruses has grown from a nuisance to perhaps the greatest obstacle to the Internet's growth and reliability. Trends in worm and virus delivery mechanisms and infection speed have also changed. Today, too often the first sign of a virus is that a part of the network goes down. Flash worms such as SQL Slammer have paved the way for future worms to carry payloads that directly target their victims and wreak havoc on government, business, and societal structures.
To address both the threats facing networks today and future scalability demands, we need new security methodologies, deployment strategies, systems, and architectures. New breeds of systems based on innovative processing components will help achieve flexible line rate high-speed security over time.
SCALING TO THE END OF SILICON WITH EDGE ARCHITECTURES, PP. 44-55
Doug Burger, Stephen W. Keckler, Kathryn S. McKinley, Mike Dahlin, Lizy K. John, Calvin Lin, Charles R. Moore, James Burrill, Robert G. McDonald, William Yoder, and the TRIPS Team
Post-RISC microprocessor designs must introduce new ISAs to address the challenges that modern CMOS technologies pose while also exploiting the massive levels of integration now possible. To meet these challenges, the TRIPS Team at the University of Texas at Austin has developed a new class of ISAs, called Explicit Data Graph Execution, that will match the characteristics of semiconductor technology over the next decade.
EDGE architectures appear to offer a progressively better solution as technology scales down to the end of silicon, with each generation providing a richer spatial substrate at the expense of increased global communication delays.
COMPOSING ADAPTIVE SOFTWARE, PP. 56-64
Philip K. McKinley, Seyed Masoud Sadjadi, Eric P. Kasten, and Betty H.C. Cheng
Compositional adaptation exchanges algorithmic or structural system components with others that improve a program's fit to its current environment. With this approach, an application can add new behaviors after deployment. Compositional adaptation also enables dynamic recomposition of the software during execution. While dynamic software recomposition dates back to the earliest days of computing, such programs were difficult to write and debug. Several new software tools and technologies now help address these problems.
The authors review the research in compositional adaptation and survey the supporting technologies, proposed solutions, and areas that require further study.
SEAMLESS MOBILE COMPUTING ON FIXED INFRASTRUCTURE, PP. 65-72
Michael Kozuch, M. Satyanarayanan, Thomas Bressoud, Casey Helfrich, and Shafeeq Sinnamohideen
The authors envision a world in which computers are provided for public use in locations ranging from coffee shops to medical office waiting rooms. In such a world, only when a user starts to use a computer will it acquire his unique customization and state, which will likewise disappear when he stops using it.
For this to be a compelling vision from a user's viewpoint, the customization and state acquisition process must be accurate and nearly instantaneous. For it to be a viable business model, the management and system administration costs of pervasive deployments of machines must be low. To address these challenges, the authors have developed Internet Suspend/ Resume, a pervasive computing technology that rapidly personalizes and depersonalizes anonymous hardware for transient use.
POLICY-BASED DYNAMIC RECONFIGURATION OF MOBILE-CODE APPLICATIONS, PP. 73-80
Rebecca Montanari, Emil Lupu, and Cesare Stefanelli
Code mobility enables dynamic customization and configuration of ubiquitous Internet applications. Mobile applications can transfer the execution of software components from one device to another depending on resource availability. They can also adapt functionality according to user needs and device characteristics. Thus, the authors have developed a policy-based approach to mobility programming that expresses and controls reconfiguration strategies at a high level of abstraction, separate from the application's functionality.
15 ms
(Ver 2.0)

Marketing Automation Platform Marketing Automation Tool