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VIM: Taming Software with Hardware
October 2003 (vol. 36 no. 10)
pp. 21-25
Mark Halpern, Principal, Berkeley Technology Group

The programming world generally agrees that software should never be written more than once. The author proposes something more radical: Much software doesn't need to be written even once--particularly software devoted to the task of memory management.

By giving programmers so much physical memory that they can proceed as if they were working with infinite memory, virtual infinite memory could make all the software dedicated to this task unnecessary. If successfully implemented, this would give applications a practically limitless amount of real memory.

Citation:
Mark Halpern, "VIM: Taming Software with Hardware," Computer, vol. 36, no. 10, pp. 21-25, Oct. 2003, doi:10.1109/MC.2003.1236467
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