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Issue No.09 - September (2003 vol.36)
pp: 4
Published by the IEEE Computer Society
METRIC AND WORKLOAD EFFECTS ON COMPUTER SYSTEMS EVALUATION, PP. 18-25
Dror G. Feitelson
While a system's performance is a function of its design and implementation, the workload researchers subject the system to and the metrics they use also can affect performance evaluation results.
There are two main approaches to performance evaluation: Analysis involves simplifications in the interest of mathematical tractability, and simulation offers a more realistic alternative that directly uses real workload recordings. The problems the author describes appear more frequently during simulation because of its ability to directly reflect complex situations, even those the evaluator does not know about or understand.
HANDHELDS GO TO SCHOOL: LESSONS LEARNED, PP. 30-37
Deborah Tatar, Jeremy Roschelle, Phil Vahey, and William R. Penuel
Mobile learning promises frequent, integral access to applications that support learning anywhere, anytime. It supports adults in the workplace and has become an attractive area for using corporate mobile devices. These devices can also support similar access for classroom learning, oriented toward face-to-face participation. Mobile learning continues and extends the learning paradigms and styles derived from the lecture-and-seminar model, while the classroom environment builds on constructivist learning paradigms that employ hands-on projects and cooperative learning groups.
In addition to meeting educational needs, classroom use of mobile devices introduces a range of challenges beyond the established Internet and Web paradigm. Innovations addressing the challenges related to network infrastructure, functionality, control, and the classroom user experience can spread to other social, informal uses of networked handhelds.
CONTEXT-AWARE MOBILE COMMUNICATION IN HOSPITALS, PP. 38-46
Miguel A. Muñoz, Marcela Rodríguez, Jesus Favela, Ana I. Martinez-Garcia, and Victor M. González
Information management in a hospital setting requires significant collaboration, mobility, and data integration. Patient care, a task often complicated by time-critical urgency, can involve many devices and a variety of staff. So far, no system has addressed these unique requirements.
The authors designed a context-aware mobile system that empowers mobile devices to recognize the context in which hospital workers perform their tasks, accounts for contextual elements, and lets users send messages and access hospital services as needed.
VEGAME: EXPLORING ART AND HISTORY IN VENICE, PP. 48-55
Francesco Bellotti, Riccardo Berta, Alessandro De Gloria, Edmondo Ferretti, and Massimiliano Margarone
The Venice Game project explores how mobile gaming can help users enhance their experience of art and history through a pleasant and challenging interaction with an urban environment's heritage and people. VeGame's participants form teams that share a handheld and play along Venice's narrow streets, discovering the city's art and history through engaging microgames.
FOSTERING A SYMBIOTIC HANDHELD ENVIRONMENT, PP. 56-65
Mandayam Raghunath, Chandra Narayanaswami, and Claudio Pinhanez
To predict the future of handhelds, the authors borrowed concepts from biology and look at the current computational environment as a jungle in which multiple device types compete for market survival. As in nature, the fittest devices rapidly increase their presence and succeed. Developers have already explored symbiosis to overcome some handheld limitations. In the symbiotic relationship between PDAs and larger desktop computers, for example, the desktop's full-size keyboard and larger display simplify application and data management on the linked PDA.
SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURAL SUPPORT FOR HANDHELD COMPUTING, PP. 66-73
Nenad Medvidovic, Marija Mikic-Rakic, Nikunj R. Mehta, and Sam Malek
Software architectures provide design-level models for composing software systems. To be useful in a programming in the small and many (Prism) development setting, these models must support implementation and evolution. Prism's highly distributed, heterogeneous, and mobile nature amplifies the software development demands that permeate the entire software engineering life cycle. Thus, the authors focus on the design, implementation, and empirical evaluation of techniques for supporting architecture-based software development in this setting.
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