This Article 
   
 Share 
   
 Bibliographic References 
   
 Add to: 
 
Digg
Furl
Spurl
Blink
Simpy
Google
Del.icio.us
Y!MyWeb
 
 Search 
   
Enter the Dragon: China's Computer Industry
February 2002 (vol. 35 no. 2)
pp. 28-36

China transformed its economy by shifting from technological nationalism to a more pragmatic strategy of developing national capabilities in conjunction with multinational corporations. Consistent with this transformation, China has revamped its industrial and technology policies to become a major producer of computer hardware and a major market for computing products. In 2000, mainland Chinese purchased more than seven million PCs, while computer hardware production grew to $23 billion.

China's policies clearly drew on the developmental approach of other Asia-Pacific countries that became leaders in the global computer industry through the strong support of government industrial and technology policies.

China has likewise become a major force in the global PC industry, as both the most attractive growth market and as a large producer. It has done so through a combination of industry promotion and entrepreneurial energy. New challenges loom as China joins the World Trade Organization and faces more pressure to open its market to foreign competition.

Citation:
Kenneth L. Kraemer, Jason Dedrick, "Enter the Dragon: China's Computer Industry," Computer, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 28-36, Feb. 2002, doi:10.1109/2.982913
Usage of this product signifies your acceptance of the Terms of Use.