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Issue No.02 - February (2000 vol.33)
pp: 56-63
ABSTRACT
<p>On the basis of media hype alone, you might conclude that biometric passwords will soon replace their alphanumeric counterparts with versions that cannot be stolen, forgotten, lost, or given to another person. But what if the actual performance of these systems falls short of the estimates? </p> <p>The authors designed this article to provide sufficient information to know what questions to ask when evaluating a biometric system, and to assist in determining whether performance levels meet the requirements of an application. For example, a low-performance biometric is probably sufficient for reducing--as opposed to eliminating--fraud. Likewise, completely replacing an existing security system with a biometric- based one may require a high-performance biometric system, or the required performance may be beyond what current technology can provide. </p> <p>Of the biometrics that give the user some control over data acquisition, voice, face, and fingerprint systems have undergone the most study and testing--and therefore occupy the bulk of this discussion. This article also covers the tools and techniques of biometric testing. </p>
CITATION
P. Jonathon Phillips, Alvin Martin, C.l. Wilson, Mark Przybocki, "An Introduction to Evaluating Biometric Systems", Computer, vol.33, no. 2, pp. 56-63, February 2000, doi:10.1109/2.820040
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