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Virtual Human versus Human Administration of Photographic Lineups
November/December 2008 (vol. 28 no. 6)
pp. 65-75
Brent Daugherty, University of North Carolina, Charlotte
Sabarish Babu, University of Iowa
Lori Van Wallendael, University of North Carolina, Charlotte
Brian Cutler, Univeristy of Ontario Institute of Technology
Larry F. Hodges, Clemson University
One solution to mistaken identification by a crime's victims and eyewitnesses is to use a virtual officer to conduct identification procedures. Results from a study comparing a virtual officer with a live human investigator indicate that the virtual officer performs comparably to the human in terms of identification accuracy, emotional affect, and ease of use.

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Index Terms:
embodied conversational agents, human-computer interaction, virtual humans, virtual police officer
Citation:
Brent Daugherty, Sabarish Babu, Lori Van Wallendael, Brian Cutler, Larry F. Hodges, "Virtual Human versus Human Administration of Photographic Lineups," IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, vol. 28, no. 6, pp. 65-75, Nov.-Dec. 2008, doi:10.1109/MCG.2008.125
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