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Illustration Motifs for Effective Medical Volume Illustration
May/June 2005 (vol. 25 no. 3)
pp. 31-39
Nikolai Svakhine, Purdue University
David S. Ebert, Purdue University
Don Stredney, Ohio Supercomputer Center
The main goal of visualization and rendering is to effectively convey information to the viewer. For scientific visualization, this goal translates into determining which portions of data to highlight and how to render these portions to concisely convey the appropriate information to the specific audience. These are the tasks that medical and technical illustrators have undertaken for centuries. We have developed a system that builds upon and extends recent work in volume illustration to produce images that simulate pictorial representations for scientific and biomedical visualizations. Our system is designed in collaboration with a trained biomedical illustrator whose work focuses on visualization for clinical research and resident surgical training. Our system combines traditional and novel volume illustration techniques. A high?level interface enables the user to specify the type of illustration and visualization goals to produce effective, illustrative rendering on commodity graphics hardware at nearly interactive rates.

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Index Terms:
volume rendering, volume illustration, illustrative styles, transfer functions, nonphotorealistic rendering
Citation:
Nikolai Svakhine, David S. Ebert, Don Stredney, "Illustration Motifs for Effective Medical Volume Illustration," IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 31-39, May-June 2005, doi:10.1109/MCG.2005.60
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