The Community for Technology Leaders
RSS Icon
Subscribe
Issue No.02 - March/April (1994 vol.14)
pp: 37-45
ABSTRACT
<p>Boundary solid grammars use design rules that express complex geometric conditions and operations using a logical reasoning mechanism, allowing one to construct powerful rules and describe appropriate grammars for the generation of solid models for a variety of design domains. The formalism I present in this article is not sufficient for all engineering and architectural domains (e.g., polyhedral solids are not adequate geometric abstractions for mechanical design). The boundary solid grammar formalism is, however, well suited to extensions for the representation of nonlinear geometry and mixed-dimensional modeling. Design in these domains will require additional representations, such as electrical and hydraulic schematics, structural and aerodynamic meshes, kinematics, and assemblies. These representations and their analysis techniques will need to be integrated into a common framework to permit interdependent design analysis and generation.</p>
CITATION
Jeff Heisserman, "Generative Geometric Design", IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, vol.14, no. 2, pp. 37-45, March/April 1994, doi:10.1109/38.267469
REFERENCES
1. U. Flemming et al., "A Pattern Book for Shadyside," tech. report, Dept. of Architecture, Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, 1985.
2. G. Stiny, "Introduction to Shape and Shape Grammars,"Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Vol. 7, 1980, pp. 343-351.
3. G. Stiny and W.J. Mitchell, "The Palladian Grammar,"Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Vol. 5, 1978, pp. 5-18.
4. H. Koning and J. Eizenberg, "The Language of the Prairie: Frank Lloyd Wright's Prairie Houses,"Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Vol. 8, 1981, pp. 295-323.
5. U. Flemming, "More than the Sum of Parts: The Grammar of Queen Anne Houses,"Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Vol. 14, 1987, pp. 323-350.
6. T.W. Knight, "The Forty-One Steps,"Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Vol. 8, 1981, pp. 97-114.
7. R. Krishnamurti, "The Arithmetic of Shapes,"Environment and Planning B, Vol. 7, 1980, pp. 463-484.
8. R. Krishnamurti, "The Construction of Shapes,"Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Vol. 8, 1981, pp. 5-40.
9. R. Krishnamurti and C. Giraud, "Towards a Shape Editor: The Implementation of a Shape Generation System,"Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, 1986, pp. 391-404.
10. S.C. Chase, "Shapes and Shape Grammars: From Mathematical Model to Computer Implementation,"Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Vol. 16, 1989, pp. 215-242.
11. C. Carlson, R. Woodbury, and R. McKelvey, "An Introduction to Structure and Structure Grammars,"Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Vol. 18, 1993, pp. 417-426.
12. C.N. Carlson,Grammatical Programming: An Algebraic Approach to the Description of Design Spaces, doctoral dissertation, Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, 1993.
13. P. Prusinkiewicz, A. Lindenmayer, and J. Hanan, "Developmental Models of Herbaceous Plants for Computer Imagery Purposes,"Computer Graphics(Proc. Siggraph), Vol. 22, No. 4, Aug. 1988, pp. 141-150.
14. M. Friedell and J. Schulmann, "Constrained, Grammar-Directed Generation of Landscapes,"Proc. Graphics Interface 90, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, Palo Alto, Calif., 1990, pp. 244-251.
15. J.A. Heisserman,Generative Geometric Design and Boundary Solid Grammars, doctoral dissertation (also available as Tech. Report EDRC 02-18-91, Eng. Design Research Center), Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, 1991.
16. J. Jaffar et al., "The CLP(R) Language and System,"ACM Trans. Programming Languages and Systems, Vol. 14, No. 3, pp. 339-395.
17. J.A. Heisserman, "Genesis Reference Manual," Tech. Report EDRC 48-23-91, Eng. Design Research Center, Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, 1991.
15 ms
(Ver 2.0)

Marketing Automation Platform Marketing Automation Tool