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The LOCOMAT Project: Recomputing Mathematical and Astronomical Tables
April-June 2012 (vol. 34 no. 2)
pp. 74-79
Denis Roegel, LORIA
The LOCOMAT project (http://locomat.loria.fr) contains reconstructions of approximately 60 historical mathematical and astronomical tables (nearly 200 PDF files) and links to about 2,000 digitized tables on Google Books and elsewhere. (LOCOMAT stands for LORIA Collection of Mathematical Tables, but it could also be read as the LORIA Collection of Mathematical and Astronomical Tables. LORIA is a research center in computer science, located in Nancy, France.) After giving a brief summary of the history of mathematical and astronomical tables, this article describes that project.

1. E. Sang,, "Tables for the Mutual Conversion of Solar and Sidereal Time," 1868.
2. H. von Hohenburg, "Tabulæ Arithmeticæ" [Arithmetic Tables], 1610.
3. J.H. Rahn, "Teutsche Algebra oder Algebraische Rechenkunst" [German Algebra or the Art of Computing], 1659.
4. J.H. Rahn, "An Introduction to Algebra," 1668.
5. J.H. Lambert, "Zusätze zu den Logarithmischen und Trigonometrischen Tabellen" [Additions to the Logarithmic and Trigonometric Tables], 1770.
6. L. Euler, "De tabula numerorum primorum usque ad millionem et ultra continuanda" [On the Table of Prime Numbers, and Beyond], Novi Commentarii Academiae Scientiarum Petropolitanae, vol. 19, 1775, pp. 132–183.
7. L. Chernac, "Cribrum arithmeticum" [Arithmetical Sieve], 1811.
8. D.N. Lehmer, Factor Table for the First Ten Millions Containing the Smallest Factor of Every Number not Divisible by 2, 3, 5, or 7 between the Limits 0 and 10017000, Hafner Pub. Co, 1956.
9. A. Fletcher et al., An Index of Mathematical Tables, Addison-Wesley, 1962.
10. L. De Mol, "What Is a Mathematical Table in Era of Digital Computing?" Proc. Mini Workshop on the History of Numerical and Graphical Tables, Oberwolfach, 2011, pp. 648–651; http://www.math.jussieu.fr/~daubin/publis OWR_2011_12.pdf.
11. D.A. Grier, When Computers Were Human, Princeton Univ. Press, 2005.
12. See in particular A. Hwang, "LATEX at Distributed Proofreaders and the Electronic Preservation of Mathematical Literature at Project Gutenberg," TUGboat, vol. 32, no. 1, 2011, pp. 32–38.
13. I. Grattan-Guinness, "Work for the Hairdressers: The Production of de Prony's Logarithmic and Trigonometric Tables," IEEE Annals, vol. 12, no. 3, 1990, pp. 177–185.
14. O. Gingerich, "Eleven-Digit Regular Sexagesimals and their Reciprocals," Trans. APS, vol. 55, no. 8, 1965, pp. 3–38.
15. Vlacq didn't actually compute these logarithms, but they were published as if he was their author.

Index Terms:
history of computing, mathematical tables, astronomical tables, LOCOMAT, LORIA, Briggs, Felkel, Kulik
Citation:
Denis Roegel, "The LOCOMAT Project: Recomputing Mathematical and Astronomical Tables," IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 74-79, April-June 2012, doi:10.1109/MAHC.2012.32
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