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Issue No.03 - July-September (2008 vol.30)
pp: 64-72
Bernadette Longo , University of Minnesota
ABSTRACT
This study focuses on the work of three mathematicians who collaborated on post-World War II projects. Specifically, the article examines connections between science policy debates and how practices of early computer developers were affected. Debate topics included ownership of technologies developed in private industry and at universities with public funding. Computer developers found solutions to the issues debated, ultimately forming the Association for Computing Machinery.
INDEX TERMS
history of computing, computers and society, science policy, World War II, Edmund Berkeley, John Curtiss, Mina Rees, Association for Computing Machinery
CITATION
Bernadette Longo, "Mathematics, Computer Development, and Science Policy Debates after World War II", IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, vol.30, no. 3, pp. 64-72, July-September 2008, doi:10.1109/MAHC.2008.50
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