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Issue No.03 - July-September (2006 vol.28)
pp: 96, c3
Paul E. Ceruzzi , Smithsonian Institution
ABSTRACT
The Internet is a technological construction with a magnitude and scope comparable to the hydroelectric dams, railroads, aircraft, and electric power systems of an earlier era. Yet, it has no obvious physical manifestation--no physical object we can point to that obviously and unambiguously represents it. This article suggests some of the reasons why that is and whether a physical essence is important in defining large-scale technological systems.
INDEX TERMS
material culture, Internet, networking
CITATION
Paul E. Ceruzzi, "The Materiality of the Internet", IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, vol.28, no. 3, pp. 96, c3, July-September 2006, doi:10.1109/MAHC.2006.58
REFERENCES
1. In T. Berners-Lee, Weaving the Web, Harper, 1999, pp. 207–208, Berners-Lee states that "Unitarian universalism had no influence on the Web. But I can see how it could have, because I did indeed design the Web around universalist (with a lowercase u) principles."
2. Twenty years later that same agency hired Bill Gates, again briefly, to develop control software for its network of PDP-10 computers.
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