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Anecdotes
April-June 2004 (vol. 26 no. 2)
pp. 86-89

1. J.A.N. Lee, C. Burke, and D. Anderson, "The US Bombes, NCR, Joseph Desch, and 600 WAVES: The First Reunion of the US Naval Computing Machine Laboratory," IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, vol. 22, no. 3, July-Sept. 2000, pp. 27-41.
2. A notable exception is D.J. Crawford and P.E. Fox's Annals article about the Autoscritcher and Superscritcher, two machines used at Arlington Hall Station: D.J. Crawford and P.E. Fox, "The Autoscritcher and Superscritcher: Aids to Cryptanalysis of the German Enigma Cipher Machine, 1944—46," IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, vol. 14, no. 3, 1992, pp. 9-22.
3. History of the Communications Branch Arlington Station, September 1941 to July 1944 (NR 3572), Historic Cryptographic Collection, Pre World War I Through World War II (Entry 9032), Nat'l Security Agency (RG 457), National Archives, College Park, MD.
4. US Dept. of Defense, The "Magic" Background of Pearl Harbor, vol. IV, Appendix, 1977, p. A-89.
5. K. Kovach, Breaking Codes Breaking Barriers: The WACs of the Signal Security Agency, US Army Intelligence and Security Command, undated, p.4.
6. The Role of the IBM at the Army Security Agency (NR 4692), Historic Cryptographic Collection, Pre World War I Through World War II (Entry 9032), Nat'l Security Agency (RG 457), Nat'l Archives, College Park, Md.
7. J. Wilcox, Solving the Enigma: History of the Cryptanalytic Bombe, Center for Cryptologic History, 2001, p. 11.
8. Information on the IBM Method for Handling Japanese Army Traffic (NR 2854), Historic Cryptographic Collection, Pre-World War I Through World War II (Entry 9032), Nat'l Security Agency (RG 457), Nat'l Archives, College Park, MD.
9. By agreement, the US Army focused on deciphering Japanese army military traffic, while the US Navy focused on Japanese naval traffic.
10. Use of High-Speed Cryptanalytic Equipment (1944—1945), Historic Cryptographic Collection, Pre-World War I Through World War II (Entry 9032), Nat'l Security Agency (RG 457), Nat'l Archives, College Park, Md.
11. General Cryptanalysis (SPSI B-3) Branch July 1944—July 1945; Signal Security Agency General Cryptanalytic Branch Annual Report FY 1945 (NR 3612), Historic Cryptographic Collection, Pre-World War I Through World War II (Entry 9032), Nat'l Security Agency (RG 457), Nat'l Archives, College Park, Md.
12. Report on Arlington Dudbuster, 2 April 1945, Enigma (Conferences, Theory, Related Information) (NR 1737), Historic Cryptographic Collection, Pre World War I Through World War II (Entry 9032), Nat'l Security Agency (RG 457), Nat'l Archives, College Park, Md.
13. Genevieve Grotjan, who broke the Japanese Purple code, is one of the few women individually identified in World War II cryptoanalytic history: J. Wilcox, Sharing the Burden: Women in Cryptology during World War II, Center for Cryptologic History, 1998, p. 1.
14. GCHQ/US Cooperation; Historic Cryptographic Collection, Pre World War I Through World War II (Entry 9032), Nat'l Security Agency (RG 457), Nat'l Archives, College Park, Md.
15. R.L. Benson, VENONA: New Releases, Special Reports, and Project Shutdown, Center for Cryptologic History, 2001, p. 1.

Citation:
Laurie Robertson, "Anecdotes," IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 86-89, April-June 2004, doi:10.1109/MAHC.2004.1299663
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