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About This Issue
April-June 2003 (vol. 25 no. 2)
pp. 2

[1] J. Abbate, Inventing the Internet, MIT Press, 1999.
[2] R. Calliau and J. Gillies, How the Web Was Born Oxford Univ. Press, 2000.
[3] J. Light, From Warfare to Welfare: Defense Intellectuals and Urban Problems in Cold War America, Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, to be published Dec. 2003.
[4] P. Baran, On Distributed Communications, RAND, 1964.
[5] P. Baran and M. Greenberger, Urban Node in the Information Network, RAND, 1967.
[6] MAC stood for multi-access computer, man and computer, or machine-aided cognition.
[7] P. Baran and M. Greenberger, Urban Node in the Information Network, RAND, 1967 p. 10.
[8] Ibid., p. 20.
[9] Lloyd Morrisett former head of the Markle Foundation and a leading sponsor of efforts to apply cable communications to improving the lives of impoverished Americans, is credited with coining the phrase digital divide in 1996.
[10] R. Yin, Cable on the Public's Mind, RAND, 1972, p. 4.
[11] K. Stetten and J. Volk, A Study of the Technical and Economic Considerations Attendant on the Home Delivery of Instruction and other Socially Related Services via Interactive Cable TV, Volume 1: The Social Aspects of Interactive Television, MITRE, 1973, pp. 37-38.

Citation:
Tim Bergin, "About This Issue," IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 2, April-June 2003, doi:10.1109/MAHC.2003.10003
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