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Issue No.04 - October-December (2001 vol.23)
pp: 29-38
ABSTRACT
<p>In this essay, CBI's former and current archivists reflect on the history and evolution of the CBI archives. Bruce H. Bruemmer, CBI's first professional archivist, served in that capacity from 1984 to 1997. Elisabeth Kaplan was appointed CBI archivist in July 1999.</p>
CITATION
Bruce H. Bruemmer, "Realizing the Concept: A History of the CBI Archives", IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, vol.23, no. 4, pp. 29-38, October-December 2001, doi:10.1109/85.969960
REFERENCES
1. Tracing CBI's name changes is an interesting exercise and indicative of the field's evolution. Proposed originally as the International Charles Babbage Society for the History of Computers and Computation, it was incorporated as the Charles Babbage Institute for the History of Information Processing. Correspondence in the CBI archives, however, demonstrates that over the years, it has been called, variously, the Center for the History of Computing, Center for the History of Computer Science, Center for the History of Information Science, and perhaps others. In 2001, the name was changed again. CBI is now the Center for the History of Information Technology. (Internal records of the Charles Babbage Institute, CBI 73, Charles Babbage Inst., Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, hereafter cited as CBI archives, CBI 73.)
2. CBI archives, CBI 73.
3. H. Lukoff,From Dits to Bits: A Personal History of the Electronic Computer, Robotics Press, Portland, Ore., 1979; K.D. Fishman, The Computer Establishment, Harper&Row, New York, 1981; S.C. Lutze, The Formation of the International Computer Industry, 1945-1960, master's thesis, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, 1979.
4. One of my favorite comments came from Harry Huskey, who after examining a user manual of a computer that he helped design, commented that he could explain why certain features appeared in the manual, but no one would be able to use the manual to better understand the real design process.
5. Joint Committee on Archives of Science and Technology, Clark A. Elliott, ed., Understanding Progress as Process: Documentation of the History of Postwar Science and Technology in the United States, Society of American Archivists, Chicago, 1983.
6. W. Aspray and B.H. Bruemmer eds., Guide to the Oral History Collection of the Charles Babbage Institute, Charles Babbage Inst., Center for the History of Information Processing, Minneapolis, Minn., 1986.
7. B.H. Bruemmer,, Resources for the History of Computing: A Guide to U.S. and Canadian Records, Charles Babbage Inst., Center for the History of Information Processing, Minneapolis, Minn., 1987.
8. B.H. Bruemmer and S. Hochheiser,The High-Technology Company: A Historical Research and Archival Guide, Charles Babbage Inst., Center for the History of Information Processing, Minneapolis, Minn., 1989.
9. Each of these three institutions held incomplete records of the Honeywell vs. Sperry Rand trial. With the support of a grant from the National Historic Publications and Records Commission, the records were integrated and microfilmed as one series following the original order assigned by the court and the parties to the suit. Each institution now holds a microfilm copy of the complete collection. A guide to the collection is available at http://www.cbi.umn.edu/collections/invcbi00145.html .
10. M.S. Mahoney,"The History of Computing the History of Technology," Annals of the History of Computing, vol. 10, no. 2, Apr.-June 1988, pp. 113-125.
11. CBI archives, CBI 73
12. M.A. Greene,"From Village Smithy to Superior Vacuum Technology: Modern Small Business Records and the Collecting Repository," Proc. Ann. Conf., Business Archives Council, London, 1997, p. 213.
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