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The Origins, Uses, and Fate of the EDVAC
January-March 1993 (vol. 15 no. 1)
pp. 22-38

The EDVAC computer was the first modern, electronic stored-program computer to be designed. It was, however, never produced to the original plan. When eventually redesigned and constructed, it was unreliable and heavily modified. This article sets out the basic facts about the machine, the uses to which it was put, the software used in an attempt to ensure its reliable operation, and its eventual fate.

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4. S.E. Gluck and W.H. Boghosian,A Functional Description of the EDVAC, Vols. 1-2, Moore School of Electrical Engineering, Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Nov. 1, 1949. (Subtitled "A final report on the work performed for the Ordnance Department, Department of the Army under contract W36- 034-ORD-7593.")
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34. A.S. Mengel, letter to John Williams of the Rand Corp., April 8, 1948. (Copies in Rand Corp. files and Oral History Archive, Smithsonian Inst.)
35. J. von Neumann, "First Draft of a Report on the EDVAC," Moore School of Electrical Engineering Report, Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 1945, reprinted in N. Stern,From. ENIAC to UNIVAC, Digital Press, Bedford, Mass., 1981, pp. 177-246. (The best reproduction of this report is available from Michael Godfrey. See page 12 in this issue for information on how to obtain it.)

Citation:
Michael R. Williams, "The Origins, Uses, and Fate of the EDVAC," IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 22-38, Jan.-March 1993, doi:10.1109/85.194089
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